Mentalisation and the Body-Mind

In this linked article, the authors pleasingly lay aside the medical model in favour of an exploration of approaches towards symptoms beyond the so-termed ‘mind-body divide’.

Go to the profile of Heather Mason
May 28, 2016
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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27222043

The simplest interventions can oftentimes be the most useful ones. Mentalization-based treatment is one of the simplest therapeutic approaches currently available in many ways as it uncomplicatedly addresses the innate human capacity to apprehend mind. Holding mind in mind is as ancient as human relatedness and self-awareness and is said to be what separates us from other living beings such as animals.

Mentalizing is described as a form of imaginative mental activity about others or oneself, perceiving and interpreting human behaviour in terms of intentional mental states (e.g. needs, desires, feelings, beliefs, goals, purposes, and reasons). Thus, in mentalization we implicitly and explicitly interpret the actions of ourselves and others as meaningful on the basis of intentional mental states.

In this linked article, the authors pleasingly lay aside the medical model in favour of an exploration of approaches towards symptoms beyond the so-termed ‘mind-body divide’. Drawing on McWhinney and Dewey’s concept of the body-mind, the authors delve into 'bodily empathy'. Within this, the process of understanding patients necessitates intersubjectivity which aims to understand the patient's experiences and sensations without jumping to diagnostic conclusions or dividing experiences into mental and physical phenomena. It really is a great read on this vitally important yet frequently neglected topic in the medical world.

Go to the profile of Heather Mason

Heather Mason

Founder of the Minded Institute, The Minded Institute

Heather Mason is a leader in the field of mind-body therapy and the founder of Yoga Therapy for the Mind. She develops innovative methods for mental health treatment drawing on her robust educational background including an MA in Psychotherapy, an MA in Buddhist Studies, studies in Neuroscience and a current MSc in Medical Physiology.. She is also a 500 RYT, a yoga therapist and an MBCT facilitator. Heather offers various professional trainings for yoga teachers, healthcare professionals and therapists, lectures around the world, and delivers training to medical students. She also develops protocols for different client populations by translating cutting edge research from the psycho-biology and neuro-biology of stress into yoga practices, breathwork, mindfulness interventions and therapeutic holding. Further she is involved in research on the efficacy of these practices, holds the annual UK yoga therapy conference and is blazing the trail for the integration of yoga therapy into the NHS

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