Yoga and Emotional Wellbeing

For some of us, asana might be a once-a-week practice or less whilst for others it might be an intrinsic part of our daily lives. It could also be that our practice goes in fits and starts, or that we tend to practice more at some times of the year than at others.

Go to the profile of Heather Mason
May 07, 2016
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For some of us, asana might be a once-a-week practice or less whilst for others it might be an intrinsic part of our daily lives. It could also be that our practice goes in fits and starts, or that we tend to practice more at some times of the year than at others.

Yoga has been shown in multiple studies to have beneficial effects on our emotional health. Emotional well being is, of course, of utmost importance to our physical and mental health. In the linked study below, measures of positive and negative affect, mindfulness, perceived stress, and arousal states were taken in 24 people with an existing weekly yoga practice, some of whom maintained their weekly practice whilst others engaged in a five-times-per-week practice across a fortnight. The morning daily practice group (five times weekly) showed significant beneficial changes in each of the measures, including an increased ability to cope with stress. These findings highlight the benefits of a daily yoga practice and perhaps might prompt us to roll out our mats a little more regularly.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27123033

Go to the profile of Heather Mason

Heather Mason

Founder of the Minded Institute, The Minded Institute

Heather Mason is a leader in the field of mind-body therapy and the founder of Yoga Therapy for the Mind. She develops innovative methods for mental health treatment drawing on her robust educational background including an MA in Psychotherapy, an MA in Buddhist Studies, studies in Neuroscience and a current MSc in Medical Physiology.. She is also a 500 RYT, a yoga therapist and an MBCT facilitator. Heather offers various professional trainings for yoga teachers, healthcare professionals and therapists, lectures around the world, and delivers training to medical students. She also develops protocols for different client populations by translating cutting edge research from the psycho-biology and neuro-biology of stress into yoga practices, breathwork, mindfulness interventions and therapeutic holding. Further she is involved in research on the efficacy of these practices, holds the annual UK yoga therapy conference and is blazing the trail for the integration of yoga therapy into the NHS

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