Yoga's Benefits for Eating Disorders

There is a growing body of evidence to suggest that yoga can be beneficial, in a plethora of ways, to people struggling with food and body image issues.

Go to the profile of Heather Mason
Jan 22, 2017
0
0
Upvote 0 Comment

http://news.medill.northwestern.edu/chicago/body-o...

There is a growing body of evidence to suggest that yoga can be beneficial, in a plethora of ways, to people struggling with food and body image issues. Research studies and personal testimonies expound and describe how yoga can facilitate the development of interoceptive awareness, increase a sense of embodiment, balance the nervous system, enable a connection with the emotions and promote a sense of transcendent sense of self; a sense of the self beyond the appearance of the physical body.

In this article, Ashley Sheil, director and yoga specialist at Renfrew Eating Disorder Treatment Centre, explains:

“Eating disorders really numb and disconnect you. But with yoga, they (the patients) start to connect back to their bodies and they notice how their bodies physically feel. They notice when they’re feeling hungry or when they’re feeling sadness, happiness, anxiety and depression.”

Here at the Minded Institute, we offer specialised modules in yoga for eating disorders; both as short workshops and also as part of our 500-hour Professional Training in Yoga Therapy. To find out more, you are warmly invited to explore our website on the link below.

Namaste.

www.themindedinstitute.com

Go to the profile of Heather Mason

Heather Mason

Founder of the Minded Institute, The Minded Institute

Heather Mason is a leader in the field of mind-body therapy and the founder of Yoga Therapy for the Mind. She develops innovative methods for mental health treatment drawing on her robust educational background including an MA in Psychotherapy, an MA in Buddhist Studies, studies in Neuroscience and a current MSc in Medical Physiology.. She is also a 500 RYT, a yoga therapist and an MBCT facilitator. Heather offers various professional trainings for yoga teachers, healthcare professionals and therapists, lectures around the world, and delivers training to medical students. She also develops protocols for different client populations by translating cutting edge research from the psycho-biology and neuro-biology of stress into yoga practices, breathwork, mindfulness interventions and therapeutic holding. Further she is involved in research on the efficacy of these practices, holds the annual UK yoga therapy conference and is blazing the trail for the integration of yoga therapy into the NHS

No comments yet.