Yoga's Benefits for Pre-Meal Negative Affects in Eating Disorders

In this study, 38 individuals in a residential eating disorder treatment program were randomised to a control or yoga intervention consisting of 1 hour of yoga before dinner for 5 days.

Go to the profile of Heather Mason
Oct 14, 2016
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https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27723416

Yoga is being increasingly offered in eating disorder residential programs...yet we have a long way to go before yoga is offered as a matter of course to all inpatients with a diagnosis of an eating disorder. Yoga has been shown to be particularly beneficial to this population on account of increases in interoceptive awareness which, in turn, enables a deeper connection to, and assimilation of, emotions. People diagnosed with eating disorders often describe being cut off 'from the neck down'; many have spent so long ignoring physical sensations related to hunger, pain, emotion and all manner of other things that they become completely cut off from the lived experience of their bodies. Yoga can beautifully bind together these severed connections, alongside numerous other psychological, physical, emotional and spiritual benefits.

In this study, 38 individuals in a residential eating disorder treatment program were randomised to a control or yoga intervention consisting of 1 hour of yoga before dinner for 5 days. Yoga significantly reduced pre-meal negative affect compared to treatment as usual; however, the effect diminished post-meal. Researchers explained that this preliminary evidence sets the stage for larger studies examining yoga and eating disorder treatment and prevention.

Go to the profile of Heather Mason

Heather Mason

Founder of the Minded Institute, The Minded Institute

Heather Mason is a leader in the field of mind-body therapy and the founder of Yoga Therapy for the Mind. She develops innovative methods for mental health treatment drawing on her robust educational background including an MA in Psychotherapy, an MA in Buddhist Studies, studies in Neuroscience and a current MSc in Medical Physiology.. She is also a 500 RYT, a yoga therapist and an MBCT facilitator. Heather offers various professional trainings for yoga teachers, healthcare professionals and therapists, lectures around the world, and delivers training to medical students. She also develops protocols for different client populations by translating cutting edge research from the psycho-biology and neuro-biology of stress into yoga practices, breathwork, mindfulness interventions and therapeutic holding. Further she is involved in research on the efficacy of these practices, holds the annual UK yoga therapy conference and is blazing the trail for the integration of yoga therapy into the NHS

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