7 ways to be happier on The International Day of Happiness.

It’s the UN’s International Day of Happiness on 20th March, celebrating the fact that ‘the pursuit of happiness is fundamental human goal.’ This year, alongside other Happiness Activists and our partners Action for Happiness, we are encouraging you to connect with friends, colleagues, strangers – this Friday.

Go to the profile of Suzy Walker
Mar 16, 2015
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Every year Action for Happiness coordinates an international campaign on International Happiness Day to promote positive social action to help create a happier and more caring world.

In 2015, the campaign is entitled: ‘Your Happiness is part of something bigger’ – and focuses on the importance of human connection to healthier and happier lives. At Psychologies, we’re celebrating connection at our Happiness Clubs this month. (You can register to create your own happiness club by clicking here.)

Why connect?

·Research shows that people with strong and broad social relationships are happier, healthier and live longer.

·Close relationships with family and friends provide love, meaning, support and increase our feelings of self-worth.

·Having a network of social support increases our immunity to infection, lowers our risk of heart diseases and also reduces mental decline as we get older.

How can you connect today on International Happiness Day?

1. Do something kind for others

What goes around comes around - and with kindness it really does. Research shows that being kind to others increases our own levels of happiness as well as theirs. What's more it has a knock-on effect - kindness is contagious, so it makes our communities nicer places to be.

www.actionforhappiness.org/take-action/do-kind-things-for-others

2. Volunteer your time, energy and skills

Whether it's a one-off or something you do on a regular basis, volunteering is good all round. As well as making a positive contribution to the happiness of others, it's a great way to meet people, get the most out of your local area and to increase your own happiness and wellbeing.

www.actionforhappiness.org/take-action/volunteer-time-energy-skills

3. Get to know your neighbours better

Getting to know the people who live nearby helps create a sense of belonging and shared identity in our local area. It also helps to strengthen connections and trust in our wider communities and contributes to a happier neighbourhood for everyone.

www.actionforhappiness.org/take-action/get-to-know-your-neighbours

4. Understand each other’s needs

Good communication is at the heart of happy relationships of all kinds. It's about understanding others' needs and having our needs heard. And it's a skill that can be learned that will help deepen our connections with the people around us.

www.actionforhappiness.org/take-action/understand-others-needs

5. Look for the good in those around you

It's easy to take our nearest and dearest for granted. Constant criticism can be highly destructive, but we often fall into this trap, especially in established relationships. But if we take time to bring to mind what we value and appreciate about others, we can both get more enjoyment from our time together

www.actionforhappiness.org/take-action/look-for-the-good-in-others

6. Download your Day of Happiness pack from:http://www.dayofhappiness.net/#happiness

7. Start your own Happiness Club today with Psychologies and Action for Happiness. Register today and get tips and inspiration from our Action for Happiness experts.

https://lifelabs.psychologies.co.uk/users/573-suzy-greaves/videos/711-happiness-club-launch

Go to the profile of Suzy Walker

Suzy Walker

Editor of Psychologies, Psychologies

I am proud to be editor of Psychologies, a magazine that champions, challenges and coaches us to think differently so we can solve our own problems and create a life that nourishes us. Author of Making The Big Leap and The Big Peace, Suzy believes that the secret to happiness is living life to the full right here, right now, committing to a few goals now and again and taking Oscar, the Psychologies dog for a walk round the field when it all gets a bit too much.

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