Interoceptive Awareness in Infancy

Interoceptive awareness is often found to be lacking in people with a wide range of mental health diagnoses, perhaps on account of the links between interoceptive awareness and our emotions.

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Oct 09, 2016
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Interoceptive awareness describes a lived sense of our bodies from the inside. It includes an awareness of our internal, physiological processes including heartrate, respiration (breathing) rate, body temperature, blood pressure, blood sugar levels, feelings of malaise and so on.

Interoceptive awareness is often found to be lacking in people with a wide range of mental health diagnoses, perhaps on account of the links between interoceptive awareness and our emotions. Emotions use the body as their stage and each of the aforementioned physiological processes alert us to the presence of various emotions in the body; i.e. increased heart rate may indicate feelings of anger, excitement or fear. Mental health struggles are often rooted, to some degree, in denied and repressed emotions. As we ignore and push down our emotions, we also ignore and push down our interoceptive awareness and can become cut off from the lived sensations of our bodies in the process.

A return to our emotions, therefore, necessitates a return to the internal processes of our physical organism, which is something the practice of yoga can support us with beautifully. In this post, we shall take a brief look at interoceptive awareness in relation to childhood attachment; a secure attachment to our primary caregiver enables us to more readily recognise, embrace and respond usefully to our emotions.

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https://themindedinstitute.wordpress.com/2016/10/0...

Go to the profile of Heather Mason

Heather Mason

Founder of the Minded Institute, The Minded Institute

Heather Mason is a leader in the field of mind-body therapy and the founder of Yoga Therapy for the Mind. She develops innovative methods for mental health treatment drawing on her robust educational background including an MA in Psychotherapy, an MA in Buddhist Studies, studies in Neuroscience and a current MSc in Medical Physiology.. She is also a 500 RYT, a yoga therapist and an MBCT facilitator. Heather offers various professional trainings for yoga teachers, healthcare professionals and therapists, lectures around the world, and delivers training to medical students. She also develops protocols for different client populations by translating cutting edge research from the psycho-biology and neuro-biology of stress into yoga practices, breathwork, mindfulness interventions and therapeutic holding. Further she is involved in research on the efficacy of these practices, holds the annual UK yoga therapy conference and is blazing the trail for the integration of yoga therapy into the NHS

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