Study Finds Reduced Indicators of Stress in the Saliva of People Practicing Yogic Breathing

Breaking news! The first ever study to detect salivary cytokines (which are indicative of stress levels in the body) in response to a yoga breathing practice has just been published.

Go to the profile of Heather Mason
Aug 21, 2016
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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27538513

Breaking news! The first ever study to detect salivary cytokines (which are indicative of stress levels in the body) in response to a yoga breathing practice has just been published.

Whilst we have lots of evidence to suggest yoga's benefits for stress in a multitude of ways, we are only just beginning to understand the molecular mechanisms through which yogic breathing affects stress. In this groundbreaking study, scientists randomised twenty healthy volunteers into two groups; the yogic breathing group performed two yogic breathing exercises, each for ten minutes, for a total of twenty minutes in a single session as directed by a trained yoga instructor. The control group read a text of their choice for 20 min.

Saliva was collected immediately after the breathing practice at 0, 5, 10, 15 and 20 min intervals and analysed. The levels of interleukin and monocyte chemotactic protein, both markers for stress in the body, were significantly reduced in yogic breathing group when compared to the control group. Our hope is that studies and findings such as this will encourage further research into the molecular mechanisms behind the stress-reducing effects of yoga, which we are just at the tip of the iceberg of understanding. Exciting time ahead.

Go to the profile of Heather Mason

Heather Mason

Founder of the Minded Institute, The Minded Institute

Heather Mason is a leader in the field of mind-body therapy and the founder of Yoga Therapy for the Mind. She develops innovative methods for mental health treatment drawing on her robust educational background including an MA in Psychotherapy, an MA in Buddhist Studies, studies in Neuroscience and a current MSc in Medical Physiology.. She is also a 500 RYT, a yoga therapist and an MBCT facilitator. Heather offers various professional trainings for yoga teachers, healthcare professionals and therapists, lectures around the world, and delivers training to medical students. She also develops protocols for different client populations by translating cutting edge research from the psycho-biology and neuro-biology of stress into yoga practices, breathwork, mindfulness interventions and therapeutic holding. Further she is involved in research on the efficacy of these practices, holds the annual UK yoga therapy conference and is blazing the trail for the integration of yoga therapy into the NHS

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